Definitions

What does “OPEN MATTE” mean?

Posted on February 12, 2016. Filed under: Definitions |

Illustration of open matte filming

A frame from a 35mm film print. Here, the picture is framed for the intended theatrical aspect ratio (inside the yellow box). Picture outside the yellow box is matted out when the film is shown in widescreen. For 4:3 television versions, a large portion of the picture can be used (inside the red box) with an open matte.

Open matte is a filming technique that involves matting out the top and bottom of the film frame in the movie projector (known as a soft matte) for the widescreen theatrical release and then scanning the film without a matte (at Academy ratio) for a full screen home video release.

Source: Wikipedia

The scene tag was introduced on 2016-02-07 for the rip Coyote.Ugly.2000.OPEN.MATTE.READNFO.HDTV.x264-REGRET. This is an excerpt from the accompanying NFO file:

RNFO: We are going to try something new. Rather than spam tag READNFO on all our releases with a different ar containing more picture than
the already released retail, we are going to tag them as OPEN.MATTE. As always a comparison image will be included in the Sample directory.
And, if you’re clueless as to what open matte is for some reason, read this: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Open_matte

Some might argue that the tag OPEN.MATTE is invalid due to this line of the ruleset:
Other permitted tags are: PROPER, REPACK, RERIP, REAL, UNCUT, DUBBED, SUBBED, INTERNAL, OAR, PPV

However, in response to that, we say, what about these tags not mentioned in the ruleset?

The.Wire.S01E01.REMASTERED.READNFO.HDTV.x264-BATV
Undateable.2014.S03E12-E13.WEST.FEED.720p.HDTV.x264-KILLERS
The.Boondocks.S04E06.UNCENSORED.720p.HDTV.X264-DIMENSION
The.Godfather-A.Novel.for.Television.1977.UNCENSORED.EXTENDED.720p.HDTV.x264-BATV
Charlie.Hebdo-Three.Days.That.Shook.Paris.ALTERNATE.CUT.720p.HDTV.x264-WaLMaRT

Etc.

Their releases still got nuked for using the tag.

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What does “remux” mean?

Posted on September 9, 2015. Filed under: Definitions | Tags: , , |

Remuxing is a lossless process that simply takes the video and audio streams from one container and puts them into a new container.

Untouched is the complete disc containing everything: extras, commentary, deleted scenes, etc.

A remux is downsized: same quality movie without extra features. In a remux, the remuxer can remove the other audios/subtitles that he/she doesn’t want, thus saving themselves and others some space while having the same quality as the untouched disc. A remux can be in any container (.m2ts also) but most prefer an MKV container.

In short, a remux is for those who don’t care that much about extras and want to save space while having the movie in .mkv container so they can play them easily with any player with the same quality as that of the untouched.

Source

A remux is a rip of a Blu-ray or HD DVD disc to another container format or just stripping the disc of menus and bonus material while keeping the contents of its audio and video streams intact (also keeping the current codecs), guaranteeing the exact 1:1 movie quality as on original disc.

Source

Remux is not a scene tag or terminology used in the scene, although untouched is certainly used in the nfo files of complete bluray releases. Only the copyright protection is stripped and the complete bluray releases are made region free.

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What does “BBB” mean?

Posted on September 9, 2015. Filed under: Definitions | Tags: , |

Garfield parody cartoon

Garfield warez scene parody cartoon
Original copyrights Jim Davis, Paws. Inc

Transcript:

Wanna affil on .se site!!!
Garfield: Blah! I got BBB’s coming out ears.
Fine, anyone else want a 300mbit?
Garfield: W00T!!!

BBB sites were some kind of topsites ran at the Swedish Bredbandsbolaget internet provider. It was the first fast internet provider in Europe. There was obviously a lot of interest to run warez sites on these connections. The cartoon is from 2003. The original image was published on January 30, 2003.

There were some limitations:

BBB .se sites need to use high priority dataports to get good speeds towards some other parts of europe

Source

More Garfield warez scene parody cartoons can be viewed on Imgur.

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What does “CRF” mean?

Posted on September 28, 2014. Filed under: Definitions | Tags: |

CRF stands for Constant Rate Factor, x264’s best single-pass encoding method.

Quick Summary: What is the Constant Rate Factor?

The Constant Rate Factor (CRF) is the default quality setting for the x264 encoder. You can set the values between 0 and 51, where lower values would result in better quality (at the expense of higher file sizes). Sane values are between 18 and 28. The default for x264 is 23, so you can use this as a starting point.

With ffmpeg, it would look like this:
ffmpeg -i input.mp4 -c:v libx264 -crf 23 output.mp4

If you’re unsure about what CRF to use, begin with 23 and change it according to your subjective impression of the output. Is the quality good enough? No? Then set a lower CRF. Is the file size too high? Choose a higher CRF. A change of ±6 should result in about half/double the file size, although your results might vary.

0 (losless) <- better <- 18 <- 23 -> worse -> 28 -> 51 (worst)

CRF in a nutshell

The way constant quality encoding is usually done, it keeps up a constant quality by compressing every frame of the same type the same amount. In tech speak, that’s maintaining a constant QP (quantization parameter). The quantization parameter defines how much information to “throw away” from a given block of pixels.

Constant Rate Factor, on the other hand, will compress different frames by different amounts. It does this by taking motion into account.

The eye perceives more detail in still objects than when they’re in motion. Because of this, a video compressor can apply more compression (drop more detail) when things are moving, and apply less compression (retain more detail) when things are still. Subjectively, the video will seem to have higher quality.

How to use it

If you’re using x264, CRF is used by default for constant quality.

But isn’t that other way, constant QP, really better quality in the end?

No. It just wastes space by compressing less in areas you really won’t notice. This isn’t even like MP3s cutting off highs and lows in music that are audible on CDs. There is not a purist’s argument to made here.

If you were a computer, you would look at a CRF encoding and say it was lower quality than the CQP copy. And it would be. But if you’re a human being, subjectively, the CRF copy will look better. It least compresses the parts you see the most, and most compresses the parts you see the least.

Many people always use CRF for single-pass encodes and argue there is no reason to ever use CQP.

Slightly more technical explanation

A constant QP encode at Q=18 will stay at Q=18 regardless of the frame. Constant Rate Factor will increase the Q to, say, 20, for high motion frames (compressing them more) and lower it down to 16 for low motion. That means that while the average quality as objectively gauged by PSNR goes slightly down, the *perceptible* image quality goes up.

When you use a constant rate factor, it varies the QP slightly. When a scene has a lot of action and motion, it will raise the QP (compressing more). This is because your eye will be distracted by everything going on, and won’t have the image on screen for enough time to see the heavier compression. When a frame doesn’t have a lot of motion, it will lower the QP, compressing it less. This is because your eye will have more time to look at the image, so you want it to be as much like the source as possible.

CRF is about improving subjective quality — what the human eye sees — at the expense of objective quality — what a PSNR calculation sees. There is no way for anyone to tell you what your eye will notice on any given film.

If quality goes down in motion, does that mean it gets all blocky like my digital TV?

CRF is not the cause of the blocking you might see on digital cable/sat broadcasts. That derives from too low of a bitrate.

Different bitrates correspond to different compression rate factors with different sources. So 1500kbps will be enough to get an RF of 15 with one source, but only an RF of 20 with another, dirtier source. When you use CRF or CQP you’re saying “use whatever bitrate is necessary to preserve this much detail.” It’s not a 1-to-1 thing.

Those TV broadcasts get blocky because the complex things they’re displaying require more bits than the broadcaster has chosen to give them. They say “preserve as much detail as you can while never going above this high a bitrate no matter how complicated things get.”

But still… isn’t lower quality bad?

When you use CRF, it raises the QP (compressing more, losing more detail) for complex parts, yes. But it doesn’t raise it drastically, and it makes sure those complex parts still maintain a set quality level. Just a level a little lower than the simple parts. The bitrate for those parts might still be higher than for the simple parts, because the bitrate needed at a given moment to reach a given rate factor fluctuates. You can go to a lower RF for the simple parts while still keeping a bitrate similar to what you need for the complex parts at a higher RF.

If you use a CRF of 25, sure, you’re going to see blocking on high-motion because the bitrate is simply too low. It’s going to be using a QP of, like, 27 for the complex parts, which is way too heavy a quantizer. And it’ll only use, say, 23 for the simple parts, which isn’t quite low enough to drastically increase quality. But if you use reasonable CRF values, in the range of, say, 23-17, this won’t occur.

Text taken from “CRF Guide” written by Jonathon Rubin.[1]. Improvements made by Werner Robitza.[2]

Footnotes

1. Constant Rate Factor – ReScene wiki
2. CRF Guide – Werner Robitza

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What Does “FREEWEB” Mean?

Posted on November 18, 2013. Filed under: Definitions | Tags: , , |

The tag “FREEWEB” is used on MP3 scene releases. It is added to the release directory name when the music is freely downloadable from the internet. The tag was first used by the warez group KPS (kilocycles per second) on February 22, 2010. This is a piece of that NFO file: Desert_Planet-Mortal_Kombo-READ_NFO-FREEWEB-2010-KPS_INT

PLEASE READ:

You are surely asking yourself: “WTF? Why are these
jerks preing free-from-web stuff?”

Well, let us explain, there are a few reasons:
– The stuff is only available as a free download.
– Possibly better quality than an existing release (e.g.
a vinyl-rip).
– Making good stuff available to you or poiting you in
the direction of some good stuff.

Therefore KPS is proud to present:
– The FREEWEB-Tag –
The current Official MP3 Release Rules do not provide a
possibility to tag releases like these. Therefore we’d
like to establish a
foundation to get those free-from-web releases pred
properly.

Here are some regulations on how to employ the
FREEWEB-tag:
1. Only releases with the MPEG-1 Audio Layer 3 (MP3) are
allowed
to be tagged with the FREEWEB-tag.
2. Regarding encoding quality, we pre the mp3 files as
we got them from web. This means that we do not set any
restrictions regarding
the bitrates. Even if the quality should be below 192
kbit CBR.
3. The NFO has to include the URL to the homepage where
the files came from.
4. Multiples encoders are allowed (cf. rule 2).

The group k4 wrote the following in their first freeweb release (VA-Ich_Danketsu_A_Megapeng_Compilation-FREEWEB-2011-k4_int):

Within our first releases we want to provide you, the outside world, with some
information about us, k4. We are a group composed of music addicts who are not
bounded to any musical genre. In connection with our free spirit we do not care
too much about so-called “scene standards” especially the new proofing
requirements. Nonetheless we want to release our stuff in compliance with the
existing council rules.
If there is a release not fully matching those requirements, we will tag it as
an internal release, e.g. if the music is available for free from web. We hope
you will enjoy another great musical trip with our releases.
For any questions climb up mountain k4. We will wait there for you.

Because FREEWEB releases are banned within the current MP3 ruleset, most are released as an internal release. Some groups tried to release them as a regular MP3 release, but got nuked for it. Official_MP3_Release_Rules_3.0-2011-MP3COUNCIL:

[WEB] – audio files legally available on the net and not free
dirtag needed: -WEB-

Capital_STEEZ-Amerikkkan_Korruption-FREEWEB-2012-KLIN
NUKED: free.from.web/oneNET

Cap_Kendricks_und_Edgar_Wasser-Wir_Korrigieren_4_Tonnen_Stahl_Mit_Einer_Hand-FREEWEB-DE-2012-CUSTODES
NUKED: freeweb.not.allowed_not.purchased.from.a.legitimate.webshop/LocalNet

Currently (November 2013) there are more than 600 FREEWEB releases, released by 21 groups:

  • BF4E_INT
  • CUSTODES_INT, CUSTODES
  • D2H_INT, D2H
  • DECRyPTED_iNT
  • FaiLED_INT
  • FUTUREBASS_iNT
  • iDiB_iNT
  • iWR_INT
  • k4_int, k3_int
  • KALEVALA_INT
  • KETAMiN_iNT
  • KLIN
  • KPS_INT, KPS_TNT
  • m00f_int
  • MPX_INT
  • MuSiKa_INT
  • NMNL_iNT
  • PWT_INT
  • TAiPx_iNT
  • WROOM
  • XTC_iNT
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What does “1080MBAFF” mean?

Posted on October 18, 2013. Filed under: Definitions | Tags: , , , |

For fans of The Walking Dead checking out their favourite scene pre database, you may have seen an oddly tagged release of the season 4 premiere from a group named BWB.

The.Walking.Dead.S04E01.1080MBAFF.HDTV.H264-BWB

While this is the first scene release tagged with MBAFF, there have already been several P2P releases tagged with it. Why not tag it as 1080i or 1080p, but rather 1080MBAFF? As you may already know, the i in 480i/576i/1080i stands for interlaced. As defined by Wikipedia, interlaced video is a technique of doubling the perceived frame rate introduced with the signal without consuming extra bandwidth. Interlaced channels are typically 29.97fps (NTSC) or 25fps. (PAL) All television channels with the exception of 720p channels are broadcasted as interlaced. The p in 720p stands for progressive, which means the video does not have the interlacing lines throughout. The frame rate is doubled, however in most cases the frames are doubled, meaning every other frame is a duplicate rather than an interlaced frame. For NTSC that’d mean they’re 59.96 fps and 50fps for PAL. Click the image below to clearly see what an interlaced frame looks like. Any progressive material will not have such frames. All scene releases are deinterlaced, meaning the interlaced frames are ironed out to make the full video progressive.

vlcsnap-2013-10-18-09h44m17s168

In the case of 1080MBAFF, however, it’s a combination of both interlaced and progressive video. This means BWB did not reencode their video, as they mentioned in their NFO of the release.

Pointless to re-encode such grainy source.

What’s MBAFF?!

Macroblock-adaptive frame-field (MBAFF) coding, using
a macroblock pair structure for pictures coded as frames,
allowing 16×16 macroblocks in field mode (compared with
MPEG-2, where field mode processing in a picture that
is coded as a frame results in the processing of 16×8
half-macroblocks).

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/H.264/MPEG-4_AVC

MBAFF allows a single frame to be encoded partly progressive and partly interlaced. AfterDawn has a little more information on this:

MBAFF, or Macroblock-Adaptive Frame/Field Coding, is a video encoding feature of MPEG-4 AVC that allows a single frame to be encoded partly progressive and partly interlaced. Maintaining the quality of interlaced video can be a challenge in video encoding because of the larger spaces between horizontal lines in the same field. MBAFF allows an AVC encoder to examine each block in a frame to look for similarities between interlaced fields. When there is no motion the fields will tend to be very similar, resulting in better quality if you encode the block as progressive video. For blocks where there is motion from one field to another the quality is more likely to suffer if encoded progressive, so these blocks can remain interlaced. 

In addition to quality improvements, progressive frames require fewer bits making them more compressible for the same quality as interlaced frames. This also applies to individual macroblocs, meaning that by using MBAFF you may greatly improve quality for a given bitrate. Since all the decisions required for MBAFF are made by the encoder it can slow encoding speeds greatly. Being a relatively new technology it’s also not supported well among AVC playback software. Unlike many of AVC’s advance features, though, MBAFF doesn’t affect decoder speed. 

Currently there are no rules disallowing 1080p or 1080MBAFF releases in the scene so such releases cannot be nuked.

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What does “APDTV” mean?

Posted on August 23, 2013. Filed under: Definitions | Tags: |

APDTV stands for Analog Pure Digital Television. The tag is sort of an oxymoron, as analog and digital both appear in the tag and are completely different in the world of television. Let’s break it down. The source of A/PDTV is 576i/576p (or in the US 704i)- it’s a step above a DSR (480i) but lower than HDTV (720p/1080i). PDTV itself is digital, but in this case APDTV is analogue (hence the A in front of PDTV) because it was capped by any of the ways allowed as specified in the scene rules for AHDTV which you can read below. You can also read more about PDTV here.

AHDTV stands for Analog High Definition Television. The tag is defined in the SD and HD x264 TV rule sets:

ª   - HD video taken from the decoded HD output of a set-top box (e.g.        ª
ª     component, DVI, HDMI) must be tagged in dirname as AHDTV. Decoded       ª
ª     output of PDTV or DSR sources is banned. Releases taken from a natively ª
ª     recorded transport stream shall be tagged as HDTV, PDTV, or DSR.        ª
ª     - AHDTV captures must be done at the native format of the channel, e.g. ª
ª       720p or 1080i.                                                        ª

│   - Video taken from the decoded HD output of a  set-top box (e.g.          │
│     component, DVI, HDMI) may be used as a source; source must be tagged    │
│     in dirname as AHDTV. Releases taken from a natively recorded transport  │
│     stream shall be tagged as HDTV and do not dupe AHDTV releases. AHDTV    │
│     releases do dupe HDTV. AHDTV captures must be done at the native format │
│     of the channel, i.e. 720p or 1080i.                                     │

So far the scene has only done one release tagged as APDTV. It belongs to the group C4TV and was tagged as internal.

Rugby.ITM.Cup.2013.08.23.Taranaki.vs.Wellington.INTERNAL.APDTV.x264-C4TV

As stated in the release NFO:

Looks pretty rought hence the INT. I don’t believe this was broadcast in HD. Seems the rest of the ITM Cup is being done in HD, just not this game. Enjoy anyway.

For whatever reason this single ITM Cup game was broadcasted only as 576i instead of the usual 720p or 1080i the capper was normally doing. The APDTV tag is not officially recognised in the scene at this time.

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What does “SE” mean?

Posted on August 9, 2013. Filed under: Definitions | Tags: , |

When seeing a release tagged with “SE”, one might think it’s a language tag – but it’s not. Instead, -SE- is simply short for Special Edition. In the Standard Definition x264 and XviD rulesets it states the following:

[ Special Movie Editions ]
11.1) Allowed: DC, EXTENDED, UNCUT, REMASTERED, UNRATED, THEATRICAL,
CHRONO, SE (or any other special edition).

The tag is optional and not mandatory. The -SE- tag can also be found in some music releases. Film studios can release special editions of their content for a wide variety of reasons, such as an alternate ending, a longer run time, or some other modifications.

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What does “DD” mean?

Posted on July 27, 2013. Filed under: Definitions |

The -DD- tag stands for Digital Download. It was first used for WEB mp3 releases anno 2005.

From the Hospital-London_Elektricity-NHS92-DD-2005-piratixsux (2005-06-23) nfo file: (oldest with the tag in predb)

Source – Digital Download

Project_51-Various_Artists-P51UK06-DD-2005-DEF (2005-09-05) has the following nuke reason:

(re-encoded.webrip).-DD-.means.digital-download

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What does “SBD” mean?

Posted on April 27, 2013. Filed under: Definitions | Tags: |

SBD stands for SoundBoarD, a recording of a live music event where the recording device is patched in directly to the mixing board.

A soundboard (SBD) recording has a crisper sound because the equipment is hooked up to the sound system at the venue. With a SBD, the music is being recorded onto a tape via the sound equipment in the venue (the stage microphones, the soundboard, Studio, etc.) Source

The SBD tag is used on MP3 scene releases. Source

[MP3 FILE supplied by a radio station or DJ] (and not recorded from a webstream)
dirtag needed: -SBD-

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mixing_console

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What does “DVTV” mean?

Posted on March 3, 2013. Filed under: Definitions | Tags: |

DVTV stands for Digital Versatile Television. source It was used as tag on French releases.

This is how a first French ruleset defines DVTV:

201… Ordre de qualité: DVTV –> HDTV –> PDTV ou DVBRiP ou DSR –> SDTV ou SATRIP –> TVRIP

202… DVTV: L’image provenant exclusivement de HDTV/DVD Z1 ou Z2 et le son lui
provenant de source de haute qualité de PDTV.

DVTV:

208… La Video doit provenir de HDTV/DVD PAL/NTSC uniquement.
209… Le Son doit provenir de HDTV/PDTV uniquement.
210… La provenance de la source VIDEO doit être inscrite.
211… Le DVTV est autorisé uniquement pour les séries jamais diffusées ou sorties en DVD sans SON FR.
212… Le DVTV est autorisé si les dvd sortent dans un minimum de 2 mois après la release DVTV.
213… La provenance de la video doit être inscrite dans le nfo.

Translation:

201… Quality ordering: DVTV –> HDTV –> PDTV or DVBRiP or DSR –> SDTV or SATRIP –> TVRIP

202… DVTV: the images/video comes exclusively from HDTV/DVD R1 or R2 and as for the sounds it comes from high quality PDTV sources

DVTV:

208… The video must come from HDTV/DVD PAL/NTSC exclusively.
209… The sound must come from HDTV/PDTV exclusively.
210… The source of the video must be given.
211… DVTV is allowed only for tv shows without French dub.
212… A DVTV is allowed if the dvd is released minimal 2 months after the DVTV release.
213… The source of the video must be given in the nfo.

But later in a newer ruleset:

HD-DVTV: Source vidéo provenant exclusivement d’un HD-DVD RETAiL/BLUE RAY RETAiL ou HD-DVDRiP Z1/Z2 RETAIL propre ou étranger au team la source audio propre au team provient d’une capture de source numérique

DVTV: Source vidéo provenant exclusivement d’un DVD RETAiL ou DVDRiP Z1/Z2 RETAIL propre ou étranger au team la source audio propre au team provient d’une capture de source numérique.

Translation:

HD-DVTV: Video source is exclusively from a retail HD-DVD RETAiL/BLUE RAY RETAiL or HD-DVDRiP R1/R2 RETAIL from the team or not. The audio source comes from the own team, captured from a digital source.

DVTV: Video source is exclusively from retail DVD or retail R1/R2 dvdrip from the own or foreign team and the audio is your own, captured from a digital source.

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What does “LD” and “MD” mean?

Posted on January 28, 2013. Filed under: Definitions | Tags: , , |

The LD tag stands for Line Dubbed, a term for pirate copies with an audio track, which has been ripped from the line out connection of a projector. Source

An example:
21.Jump.Street.2012.FRENCH.R5.LD.XViD-SERUM

The MD tag stands for Mic Dubbed. An example:
21.Jump.Street.R5.MD.German.XViD-CIS

Wikipedia articles explaining the situation in Germany:
http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Line_Dubbed
http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mic_Dubbed

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What does “DDC” mean?

Posted on January 22, 2013. Filed under: Definitions | Tags: |

According to the scene, DDC stands for Downloadable/Direct Digital Content.

– “DDC” refers to Downloadable/Direct Digital Content which is not freely available

Source

DDC stands for Digital Distribution Copy. Rather than a screener being sent via the post, it is sent over the internet such as via a FTP or HTTP url.
Source

Digital Distribution Copy is a version of a movie that has been obtained from a downloadable movie site such as Netflix and others.
Source

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What does “JAV” mean?

Posted on January 17, 2013. Filed under: Definitions | Tags: , |

JAV stands for Japanese adult video. The tag is often followed by the word Censored. An example: Ogura.Nana.XV-1093.JAV.Censored.DVDRip.x264-iCHiBaN. These releases do not have the XXX tag added. XXX is used to indicate pornography.

Pornographic video (called “adult video” or “AV” in Japan or sometimes “Japanese adult video” or “JAV” outside of it) covers wide themes and its only limit is censorship laws.

Wikipedia

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What does “MULTIFORMAT SCD” mean?

Posted on October 22, 2012. Filed under: Definitions | Tags: , |

The tags can be seen on the following releases: http://predb.me/?search=MULTiFORMAT+SCD

SCD stands for Sample CD. Samples can be used to create new music.

In music, sampling is the act of taking a portion, or sample, of one sound recording and reusing it as an instrument or a sound recording in a different song or piece.

Wikipedia

Multiformat means the sounds are available in multiple formats. Examples of such formats are Ableton Live Pack, Ableton Live Presets, Acid, Apple Loops, EXS, GarageBand, Halion, Kontakt, Maschine, NNXT, Reason Refill, Rex2, SFZ, Stylus RMX and Wav.

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What does “FD” mean?

Posted on September 11, 2012. Filed under: Definitions | Tags: |

FD can be seen in some NFO files:

Subtitles: EN FD (hard), NL

FD stands for Foreign Dialogs. In this example there are only English subtitles for the non-English spoken parts. The subtitles are burnt into the video file (hardcoded).

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What does “HSBS” mean?

Posted on September 10, 2012. Filed under: Definitions | Tags: , |

HSBS stands for half side-by-side. It is a 3D video format where the pictures for each eye are placed next to each other.

Into.The.Deep.1994.3D.HSBS.1080p.BluRay.x264-iFH
Notes : 3D Half Side-By-Side.

[Source]

Side-by-Side 3D

Two separate images are printed side-by-side. When viewed without a stereoscopic viewer the user is required to force his eyes either to cross, or to diverge, so that the two images appear to be three. Then as each eye sees a different image, the effect of depth is achieved in the central image of the three.

[Source]

ISO=full 1080p per eye.
Half SBS=960×1080 per eye

[Source]

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What does “PDTV” mean?

Posted on August 20, 2012. Filed under: Definitions | Tags: , , |

PDTV stands for Pure Digital Television. The 2002 TV release rules provided the first definition of the tag: [Source]

 │▌    *HDTV* (High Definition Televison): Digital recording from a source   ▐│
 │▌           stream at either 1080i or 720p at a bitrate from 19,39mbps or  ▐│
 │▌           higher.                                                        ▐│
 │▌                                                                          ▐│
 │▌                                                                          ▐│
 │▌    *PDTV* (Pure Digital Television): Other resolution digital recor-     ▐│
 │▌           dings from source streams at a bitrate of 10+mbps or higher.   ▐│
 │▌           - This includes digital recordings from digital C-Band and     ▐│
 │▌             DVB.                                                         ▐│
 │▌                                                                          ▐│
 │▌                                                                          ▐│
 │▌    *SDTV* (Standard Digital Television): Digital recording or capture    ▐│
 │▌           from a source stream at any resolution with bitrate under      ▐│
 │▌           10mbps.                                                        ▐│
 │▌           - This includes DirecTiVo but also captures from digisat or    ▐│
 │▌             digicable with analog capture cards.                         ▐│

What the release group SFM said about it in 2003: [Source]

There has been much confusion in the TV rip scene about
what HDTV and PDTV mean. For the record, here is how
SFM defines these terms. The HDTV label is given is
given to releases that are both purely digital, AND are
broadcast at either 720p (60fps) or 1080i (30fps). The
PDTV label is given to releases with purely digital
sources with direct digital stream extraction such as
via a DVB-{S,T} pci card or a HDTV card. This includes
non-HDTV resolution digital transmissions such as the
Enhanced Digital TV format used by Fox that is captured
with an HDTV card. This does NOT include a captures
from a digital source with an intermediate analog
conversion, e.g. a digital satellite reciever box with
S-Video out to a capture card. These we label as TVRips.

pdtv.nfo from scenerules.irc.gs:

WHAT IS PDTV:
PDTV (Pure Digital Television) is a high quality digital signal with no analog conversion at any step from broadcast to encode & recorded from one of the following three sources:
1) ATSC compliant broadcast signals other than the HDTV standard resolutions of 1920x1080i and 1280x720p (ex., FOX’s 704x480p “Digital Widescreen” broadcasts)
2) EU DVB signals. Typically these are similar to the ATSC resolutions, but at a PAL width (ex., 704x576p)
3) Digital C-Band broadcasts. These are non-standard but high quality, high bandwidth digital broadcast signals sent out networks to local affiliates. The locals then reformat and broadcast these over analog signals. These feeds also lack some or all of the logos found on local broadcasts. Note that in many cases are are both analog and digital c-band broadcasts. The analog are generally very good feeds, but do not qualify for PDTV status.

WHAT IS NOT PDTV:

-DirecTIVO, Dishnetplayer and other devices that digitally record a standard resolution broadcast (NTSC 480×480). The source signal is compressed and is not even close to the same quality as a PDTV source.

-HDTV/PDTV sources recorded off a TV via an analog means. This would include any caps off such a source that does not record the original transport stream to the computer, such as a captures via an AIW or Pinnacle card.

-Analog signals converted and broadcast over DTV signals. Typically stations do not broadcast high def feeds for all their shows. When they are not broadcasting HDTV/PDTV over their digital broadcast, they usually fill the air time with their analog signal on a digital carrier. This is an obvious no-no for capping as the signal is usually quite artifacted due to the station’s quick-change encoding job and far worse than the original analog signal. If there are doubts about the signal, check if it is using the full resolution of the feed. There aren’t many 4:3 over-the-air true pdtv broadcasts. If its not 16:9, its most likely upconverted. When in doubt, look for artifacting in the signal, or email the station and ask what the source is. Most stations have a technical feedback form on their website.

HOW TO TELL PDTV RELEASE FROM NON PDTV:
Admittedly, this can be a difficult task, especially if the PDTV is badly encoded. For some feeds it is obvious: If you see a FOX show that is WS when the normal broadcast is FS, then its going to be from the “FOX Digital Widescreen” PDTV broadcast. Other shows can quickly be identified as not being from a PDTV source because they don’t air on a channel that provides a PDTV resolution (shows on cable channels such as USA and SCIFI which have no HDTV/PDTV broadcasts).
If you are still uncertain and really want to know, ask for a source sample. A PDTV broadcast’s source will be at a much higher bitrate and resolution than a regular broadcast stream.

And here is the Wikipedia explanation:

PDTV is an abbreviation short for Pure Digital Television. Often seen as part of the filename of TV shows shared through P2P and the Scene FTP systems on the Internet. In this case, PDTV refers not to container, bitrate or dimensions of the video, but the digital nature of the capture source. Non Scene European rippers often use the label DVBRip or DVB-rip to specify a purely digital rip of a Digital Video Broadcast (DVB), however all Scene groups use standardized labeling.

PDTV encompasses a broad array of capture methods and sources, but generally it involves the capture of SD or non-HD digital television broadcasts without any analog-to-digital conversion, instead relying on directly ripping MPEG streams. PDTV sources can be captured by a variety of digital TV tuner cards from a digital feed such as ClearQAM unencrypted cable, Digital Terrestrial Television, Digital Video Broadcast or other satellite sources. Just as with Freeview (DVB-T) in the United Kingdom, broadcast television in the United States has no barriers to PDTV capture. Hardware such as the HDHomeRun when connected to an ATSC (Antenna) or unencrypted ClearQAM cable feed allows lossless digital capture of MPEG-2 streams (Pure Digital Television), without monthly fees or other restrictions normally implemented by a Set-top box. Although different from the analog hole, Pure Digital Television capture imposes no technological restriction on what is done with the stream; playback, Mash-Ups and even recompression/pirated distribution are possible without the permission of the rights holder.

A publisher of fan-made DVD releases also uses the name PDTV, but with no connection to the more common usage explained above. The “PD” in this case refers to “planet dust” with an additional connotation of Public Domain, even though the material offered is more often the video equivalent of abandonware as opposed to anything where copyright has actually expired. Whereas pdtv content online (as described above) is indiscriminate in terms of copyright, physical DVD releases from PDTV only exist to supply fans with material not officially published to the DVD format.

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What does “AHDTV” mean?

Posted on July 24, 2012. Filed under: Definitions | Tags: , |

AHDTV stands for Analog High Definition Television. The tag is defined in the SD and HD x264 TV rule sets:

ª   - HD video taken from the decoded HD output of a set-top box (e.g.        ª
ª     component, DVI, HDMI) must be tagged in dirname as AHDTV. Decoded       ª
ª     output of PDTV or DSR sources is banned. Releases taken from a natively ª
ª     recorded transport stream shall be tagged as HDTV, PDTV, or DSR.        ª
ª     - AHDTV captures must be done at the native format of the channel, e.g. ª
ª       720p or 1080i.                                                        ª

│   - Video taken from the decoded HD output of a  set-top box (e.g.          │
│     component, DVI, HDMI) may be used as a source; source must be tagged    │
│     in dirname as AHDTV. Releases taken from a natively recorded transport  │
│     stream shall be tagged as HDTV and do not dupe AHDTV releases. AHDTV    │
│     releases do dupe HDTV. AHDTV captures must be done at the native format │
│     of the channel, i.e. 720p or 1080i.                                     │

“The “A” in the “AHDTV” tag is for Analogue High Definition TeleVision, or in other words component cables. I see the intent to note it is not from the transport stream but that doesn’t make HDMI analogue you idiots.” [Source]

MOMENTUM is the first group to start tagging their releases with AHDTV. The.Ultimate.Fighter.Brazil.S01E04.720p.AHDTV.x264-MOMENTUM released on July 12, 2012 is the first release with AHDTV tagging.

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What does “DIRFIX” mean?

Posted on June 17, 2012. Filed under: Definitions | Tags: |

A dirfix is released when a typo or inaccuracy is detected in the original release name. E.g. the year of a movie is wrong or there was a typo in the movie name. A release does not have to be nuked to have a dirfix. A dirfix can prevent a nuke or it can get the nuked release unnuked. A dirfix does not need to have an NFO file, but usually there is one. It also depends on the ruleset: TV-x264, SDTV-x264 and FLAC enforce NFO for dirfix.

TV-x264: “DirFix requires NFO and NFO must state which release is being fixed”
SDTV-x264: “DIRFIX requires NFO and NFO must state which release is being fixed”
FLAC: “If an ADDITIONAL tag is used, the nfo MUST mention the release name that it is replacing or updating.”

Examples

The original date was wrong:

WWE.Friday.Night.Smackdown.2011.11.30.HDTV.XviD-KYR
WWE.Friday.Night.Smackdown.2011.11.29.DiRFiX.HDTV.XviD-KYR

A wrong tag was used:

Le_Trouble-Reality_Strikes-EP-WEB-2012-UTP
Le_Trouble-Reality_Strikes-DIRFIX-WEB-2012-UTP

The movie year was wrong:

The.Vow.2011.MULTiSUBS.PAL.DVDR-DVDMANiA
The.Vow.2012.DIRFIX.MULTiSUBS.PAL.DVDR-DVDMANiA

The movie name was missing a character:

Legendary.Amazon.2011.LIMITED.BLURAY.COMPLETE-BRDC.UNNUKE:get.dirfix
Legendary.Amazons.2011.LIMITED.DIRFIX.BLURAY.COMPLETE-BRDC

Sometimes the dirfix directory contains an NFO explaining the problem while fixing multiple releases at once.

Lip.Service.S02.DIRFiX.DVDRip.XviD-HAGGiS

Sorry about that, it looks like the DVD order
wasn’t the same as the air order.

Here’s how the releases should have been tagged

Original Revised

Lip.Service.S02E01.DVDRip.XviD-HAGGiS => Lip.Service.S02E02.DVDRip.XviD-HAGGiS
Lip.Service.S02E02.DVDRip.XviD-HAGGiS => Lip.Service.S02E01.DVDRip.XviD-HAGGiS
Lip.Service.S02E03.DVDRip.XviD-HAGGiS
Lip.Service.S02E04.DVDRip.XviD-HAGGiS => Lip.Service.S02E05.DVDRip.XviD-HAGGiS
Lip.Service.S02E05.DVDRip.XviD-HAGGiS => Lip.Service.S02E04.DVDRip.XviD-HAGGiS
Lip.Service.S02E06.DVDRip.XviD-HAGGiS

So the correct order to watch is

Lip.Service.S02E02.DVDRip.XviD-HAGGiS
Lip.Service.S02E01.DVDRip.XviD-HAGGiS
Lip.Service.S02E03.DVDRip.XviD-HAGGiS
Lip.Service.S02E05.DVDRip.XviD-HAGGiS
Lip.Service.S02E04.DVDRip.XviD-HAGGiS
Lip.Service.S02E06.DVDRip.XviD-HAGGiS

Again, sorry about that.

Sometimes even a dirfix is requested in the nuke:

Criminal.Minds.S03E05.Seven.Seconds.PROPER.DVDRip.XviD-SAiNTS
nuked/dupeNET/7h 5m 34s after pre: proper.tag.not.needed_no.previous.nuked.release_dirfix.needed

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What does “CONVERT” mean?

Posted on June 9, 2012. Filed under: Definitions | Tags: |

CONVERT is a tag required by the 720p x264 TV Releasing Standards,[1][2]

│   - "Native" refers to the standard in which the video was produced (e.g.   │
│     NTSC or PAL). NTSC produced video is native to NTSC, PAL produced video │
│     is native to PAL. PAL produced video that is broadcast in NTSC is       │
│     converted. NTSC produced video that is broadcast in PAL is converted.   │
│   - Converted video that has significant artifacting (e.g. blended frames)  │
│     and cannot be reversed to native must use CONVERT tag                   │
│   - Converted video that does not have significant artifacts does not need  │
│     convert tags and may not be nuked for the conversion                    │
│   - Native releases are allowed after those tagged CONVERT. Use NATIVE tag. │

and the music video standards.

    - "Native" refers to the standard in which the video was produced, e.g. NTSC or PAL.
       NTSC produced video is native to NTSC, PAL produced video is native to PAL.
       Videos may be either IVTC'able or progressive.
       PAL produced video that is broadcast in NTSC is converted.
       NTSC produced video that is broadcast in PAL is converted.
       In some special cases converts can be restored to their original progressive state.

An example of a release that was nuked for not using the CONVERT tag:

TV-X264  Episodes.S02E01.720p.HDTV.x264-TLA              2012-05-11 22:08:56
NUKED:   field.shifted_i.imgur.com.IHnON.jpg [ ZoNeNET ] 2012-05-12 00:56:21
UNNUKED: get.dirfix [ Sheep ]                            2012-05-18 22:09:46

Episodes.S02E01.CONVERT.DiRFiX.720p.HDTV.x264-TLA 0F 0M  2012-05-18 22:05:58
field shifted

This is how a shifted field looks like according to the nuke message.

Let’s explain shifted fields. If the capital letter is top field, and the small letter is bottom field, then ordinarily the fields will be lined up into frames (where the top field/bottom field combination comprises a frame):

A B C D E F
a b c d e f

But with shifted fields, one of the fields is shifted over by one frame, like so:

A B C D E F
b c d e f g

This will appear as interlacing when opened in software. Source

blended frames

This is what blended frames look like.

Ghosted or blended: you may seem to see “double images”.

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What does “PPV” mean?

Posted on November 13, 2009. Filed under: Definitions | Tags: |

This tag is commonly associated with Wrestling/UFC releases, which implies that PPV could mean “Pay Per View” – that is, the video was sourced from a pay-per-view channel.

We could really do with some evidence to support this, so please confirm or correct it in the comments below!

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What does “DirCut” mean?

Posted on August 25, 2009. Filed under: Definitions | Tags: |

See Directors.Cut.

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What does “Directors.Cut” mean?

Posted on August 25, 2009. Filed under: Definitions | Tags: |

It is the film including all scenes and takes that the director wanted, but may have been removed or changed for the theatrical or other versions.

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What does “DL” mean?

Posted on March 24, 2009. Filed under: Definitions | Tags: |

Note: I’m not referring to the common shorthand for ‘Download’.

This probably means “Dual Language” or perhaps “Double Language”. It is found on releases with two audio channels, for example English and German.

eg:
Saving.Private.Ryan.1998.AC3D.DL.1080p.HDTV.h264-CDDHD

Which has English AC3 and DTS and German AC3.

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What does “Festival” mean?

Posted on March 3, 2009. Filed under: Definitions | Tags: |

A commenter on the Suggest A Definition page, has asked for this.

Quote:
I’ve noticed the FESTIVAL tag popping up recently. I’m assuming it’s regarding the source, but do they mean the normal quality copy that’s being projected, or the low quality (but typically on a dvd already) copy that the translator/subbers work with?

[It is used in the context of..] movie releases, basically. I just remembered that it doesn’t replace the DVDRip tag in all these examples, so it’s probably not indicating the source format. My next best bet would be that it’s akin to the LIMITED tag, just providing some information/explanation about how widely distributed it is. Hm, some movies premier at a festival, so getting a copy then would be really beating the release in most countries. Others I’ve seen have a lot of success in their home country, and thus end up at other international film festivals. *shrugs* Just thinking it’s hard to conclude exactly what your average FESTIVAL tag would be telling you.

Examples:
The Escapist FESTIVAL DVDRip XviD-COALiTiON
Killer Movie 2008 Real Festival DVDRiP XviD-iNTiMiD
Redemption 2007 Festival DVDRiP XviD-iNTiMiD
The Crew 2008 FESTiVAL DVDRip XviD-NODLABS

If anyone knows any more details, and can back their information up, please let us know in the comments below!

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What does “SUBBED” mean?

Posted on September 3, 2008. Filed under: Definitions | Tags: |

In the case of a VCD, if a release is subbed, it usually means it has hard encoded subtitles burnt throughout the movie. These are generally in malaysian/chinese/thai etc, and sometimes there are two different languages, which can take up quite a large amount of the screen. SVCD supports switch able subtitles, so some DVDRips are released with switch able subs. This will be mentioned in the NFO file if included.

When a film has had a subbed release in the past, an “UNSUBBED” release may follow.

Source:
VCD Quality: FAQ

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What does “Pre” mean?

Posted on August 12, 2008. Filed under: Definitions | Tags: |

Pre, or “Pretime” (in this context) is the time taken between a group releasing something, and it becoming available on a torrent site or NewsGroup, or wherever. Different sources have different pretimes.

It could also refer to the time a release was created, and is useful for instance in deciding which of two releases was first, and hence which to nuke as a dupe.

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What does “TRACKFIX” mean?

Posted on August 2, 2008. Filed under: Definitions | Tags: |

If one or more tracks from an album or collection of files is wrongly tagged or corrupted, then the release group releases a “FIX” including just the files needed to complete a working collection. This is most common when a single MP3 file or similar is corrupted in a collection of songs, ie on an album. The “fix” can also appear on the next release in a series, such as a weekly radioshow or chart collection, where one of the songs is corrupt the previous week.

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What does “RETAIL” mean?

Posted on August 2, 2008. Filed under: Definitions | Tags: |

This means the release is taken from the retail version – the one bought from stores, as opposed to a limited edtion or otherwise different version.

To elaborate, a retail release is one sold to the general public by shops – on the high street and online. It is a physical release such as a physical CD or DVD.*

Some examples of non-retail releases are:

  • Incomplete releases, where some parts have been stripped. Common in DVD-R releases, where trailers, adverts, or alternative audio tracks, subs etc have been removed.
  • Screeners, CAMs, etc – releases not meant for public consumption.
  • Limited versions, of which only a small number were created or sold. For instance, a special edition BluRay disk.

* I don’t know if iTunes store and the like count as retail. Anyone care to comment, or have an example release nfo which answers this?

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What does “WEB” mean?

Posted on August 2, 2008. Filed under: Definitions | Tags: |

Bought/Ripped from a webshop.

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What does “SAT” mean?

Posted on August 2, 2008. Filed under: Definitions | Tags: |

Live show recorded from a satellite radio.

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What does “LINE” mean?

Posted on August 2, 2008. Filed under: Definitions | Tags: |

“Line” relates to the source of the audio for the release, which is typically recorded from the headphone output in a cinema, then dubbed over an existing video source from another country. The result is a better quality audio stream than perhaps a cam might have.

If anyone has any clearer information, let us know!

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What does “FM” mean?

Posted on August 2, 2008. Filed under: Definitions | Tags: |

Live show recorded from an analogue, “frequency modulated” signal, like local radio.

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What does “CABLE” mean?

Posted on August 2, 2008. Filed under: Definitions | Tags: |

Live show recorded from radio using cable.

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What does “VINYL” mean?

Posted on August 2, 2008. Filed under: Definitions | Tags: |

Track(s) ripped from vinyl.

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What does “DVDA” mean?

Posted on August 2, 2008. Filed under: Definitions | Tags: |

Whole music album ripped from dvd.

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What does “CDA” mean?

Posted on August 2, 2008. Filed under: Definitions | Tags: |

Whole music album ripped from cd.

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What does “CDS” mean?

Posted on August 2, 2008. Filed under: Definitions | Tags: |

One track with remixes ripped from cd.

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What does “R5” mean?

Posted on July 29, 2008. Filed under: Definitions | Tags: |

R5 releases are a studio-produced, unmastered Telecine transfer of the film put out quickly and cheaply to compete against piracy in Russia. Mostly they are released with Russian audio only, so scene groups have to source direct English audio. For this reason, audio quality may be lacking, whilst the video quality is usually comparable to a DVDScr. (more…)

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What does “AC3” mean?

Posted on July 23, 2008. Filed under: Definitions | Tags: |

Dolby Digital

Dolby Digital

AC-3 is Dolby Digital (also “DD”) audio codec which can contain up to 6 channels of sound. (more…)

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What does “DTS” mean?

Posted on July 23, 2008. Filed under: Definitions | Tags: |

DTS means “Digital Theatre System” and is a multi-channel digital surround sound format.

A free Codec for DTS & AC3 is available at ac3filter.net, but VLC plays it just fine.

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What is an “mkv” file, and how do i play it?

Posted on July 18, 2008. Filed under: Definitions, Explanations | Tags: |

A “.mkv” is a video file, which can be played with Media Player Classic* or VLC among others. The Matroska Multimedia Container is an open standard free Container format, a file format that can hold an unlimited number of video, audio, picture or subtitle tracks inside a single file. (more…)

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What does “BluRay” mean?

Posted on July 17, 2008. Filed under: Definitions | Tags: |

BluRay Logo

BluRay Logo

Blu-ray is an optical disc storage media format, used primarily for storing high-definition video. Releases with this tag are ripped from a BluRay disk. BluRays often associated with 720p and 1080p resolutions. (more…)

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What does “DC” mean?

Posted on July 17, 2008. Filed under: Definitions | Tags: |

See Directors.Cut.

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What does “BD5” and “BD9” mean?

Posted on July 17, 2008. Filed under: Definitions | Tags: , |

BD5/BD9 are types of BluRay Rip.

From wikipedia: “BD9 and BD5 are lower capacity variants of the Blu-ray Disc that contain Blu-ray compatible video and audio streams contained on a conventional DVD optical disc. Such discs offer the use of the same advanced compression technologies while utilizing lower cost legacy media. BD9 utilizes a standard 8152MB DVD9 dual-layer disc while BD5 utilizes a standard 4489MB DVD5 single-layer disc.” (more…)

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What does “INT” mean?

Posted on July 17, 2008. Filed under: Definitions | Tags: |

“INT” is simply an abbreviation of “INTERNAL“.

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What does “Non-Scene” mean?

Posted on July 17, 2008. Filed under: Definitions | Tags: |

This means that the release in question is not from “the scene” – it was not released by a genuine scene releaser but by either a one-off user, or other organised group of people. Official scene releases obey the Scene Rules. (more…)

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What does “BDRip” mean?

Posted on July 16, 2008. Filed under: Definitions | Tags: |

In short, “BDRip” stands for BluRay Disk Rip. Also read about “BD5” and “BD9”.

Quality

BDRips are encoded directly from the BluRay disk, so should be of better quality than a DVDRip. They usually have a resolution of 720p (or 1080p), and are encoded using the matroska (.mkv) container and x264 codec.

Playback

“Can i play a BD rip on my hd dvd player in the same way i play a dvd rip on my dvd player?” It depends on the codec used, and what your HD-DVD player supports.

Summary of other (UNVERIFIED) comments

  • Since the end of January ’07, the Scene have been releasing BluRay and HD-DVD rips.
  • In the scene, “.BluRay.” x264 releases dupe “.HDDVD.” releases. That is to say, they appreciate that they are the same quality.
  • Some places refer to a BDRip as an XviD .avi file, ripped from a BluRay disc, in the same way as a DVDRip is ripped from a DVD.
  • Bluray Rips are far superior to DVD rips. A DVD rip is often around 640×272 pixels which equals .174 Megapixels per frame. A Bluray rip is often relased at 1280X720 pixels, which equals .921 Megapixels per frame. ANY LCD will resolve more than the 272 vertical pixels a typical DVD rip contains!!

Other Links

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What does “WP” mean?

Posted on July 16, 2008. Filed under: Definitions | Tags: |

A workprint is a copy of the film that has not been finished. It can be missing scenes, music, and quality can range from excellent to very poor. Some WPs are very different from the final print, and others can contain extra scenes. Workprints can be nice additions to the collection once a good quality final has been obtained. (more…)

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What does “TVRip” mean?

Posted on July 16, 2008. Filed under: Definitions | Tags: |

A TVRip is a TV episode that is either from Network* or PRE-AIR from satellite feeds sending the program around to networks a few days earlier. Some programs contain extra parts, or camera/commentary tests. (more…)

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What does “SCR” mean?

Posted on July 16, 2008. Filed under: Definitions | Tags: , |

A scr, or “Screener”, is a pre VHS tape, sent to rental stores, and various other places for promotional use. A screener is supplied on a VHS tape, and is usually in a 4:3 (full screen) aspect ratio, although letterboxed screeners are sometimes found. The main draw back is a “ticker” (a message that scrolls past at the bottom of the screen, with the copyright and anti-copy telephone number). Also, if the tape contains any serial numbers, or any other markings that could lead to the source of the tape, these will have to be blocked, usually with a black mark over the section. (more…)

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What does “TC” mean?

Posted on July 16, 2008. Filed under: Definitions | Tags: |

A telecine machine copies the film digitally from the reels. Sound and picture should be very good, but due to the equipment involved, and cost, telecines are fairly uncommon. Generally the film will be in correct aspect ratio, although 4:3 telecines have existed. (more…)

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What does “TS” mean?

Posted on July 16, 2008. Filed under: Definitions | Tags: |

A telesync is the same spec as a CAM except it uses an external audio source (most likely an audio jack in the chair for hard of hearing people). (more…)

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What does “CAM” mean?

Posted on July 16, 2008. Filed under: Definitions | Tags: |

A CAM is a theater rip usually done with a digital video camera. A mini tripod is sometimes used, but a lot of the time this wont be possible, so the camera may shake. Seating placement isn’t always ideal either, so it might be filmed from an angle. If cropped properly, this is hard to tell unless there’s text on the screen, but a lot of times these are left with triangular borders on the top and bottom. Sound is taken from the onboard microphone of the camera, and especially in comedies, laughter can often be heard during the film. Due to these factors picture and sound quality are usually quite poor, but sometimes we’re lucky, and the theater will be fairly empty, resulting in a fairly clear signal. (more…)

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What does “LIMITED” mean?

Posted on July 16, 2008. Filed under: Definitions | Tags: |

A limited movie means it has had a limited theater run, generally showing in fewer than 250 theaters. (more…)

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What does “INTERNAL” mean?

Posted on July 16, 2008. Filed under: Definitions | Tags: |

“INTERNAL” is a scene tag. It is applied to a release for several reasons. An INTERNAL release is not allowed to be posted outside the groups affiliated sites, without the prior permission of that site’s operators. (more…)

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What does “STV” mean?

Posted on July 16, 2008. Filed under: Definitions | Tags: |

Straight To Video – It was never released in theaters. (more…)

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What does “REPACK” mean?

Posted on July 16, 2008. Filed under: Definitions | Tags: |

“REPACK” is a scene tag. If a group releases a bad rip, they will release a Repack which will fix the problems. Either that, or it will be nuked and another group may release a PROPER version. (more…)

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What does “DUPE” mean?

Posted on July 16, 2008. Filed under: Definitions | Tags: |

“DUPE” is a scene tag, and is quite simply, if something exists already, then there’s no reason for it to exist again without good reason. (more…)

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What does “PROPER” mean?

Posted on July 16, 2008. Filed under: Definitions | Tags: |

“PROPER” is a scene tag. As defined in the scene rules, whoever releases the first version of a release – for instance, the Telesync of a film – has won that ‘race’. However, if the release is nuked, or there is some other problem with it, another group can release a PROPER. (more…)

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What does “FS” mean?

Posted on July 16, 2008. Filed under: Definitions | Tags: |

“FS” is an aspect ratio tag, which simply means FullScreen. These look good on square screens, but can become stretched on widescreen monitors. (more…)

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What does “WS” mean?

Posted on July 16, 2008. Filed under: Definitions | Tags: |

“WS” is an aspect ratio tag, which simply means WideScreen, or “letterbox”. These look good on wider screens, but can look stupid on squarer monitors, as they cut off so much screen above and below the image. (more…)

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What does “AXXO” mean?

Posted on July 16, 2008. Filed under: Definitions | Tags: |

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When a file ends with “-aXXo”, it means that the file was* released by aXXo. This is an individual who releases many movies onto the internet. His/her** name is interpreted to be a guarantee of quality, because aXXo always releases quality DVDRips of new and old films. (more…)

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What does “DVDRip” mean?

Posted on July 16, 2008. Filed under: Definitions | Tags: |

A DVD-Rip is a bootleg video ripped from a DVD source and then released on the Internet in a new format that is easily downloadable. As a rule, they’re much better quality than CAMs, and easier to watch than DVD Screeners. (more…)

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What does “DVDscr” mean?

Posted on July 16, 2008. Filed under: Definitions | Tags: |

Unlike a normal Screener, a DVD Screener is a pre-release DVD sent to critics for review purposes. These are sometimes leaked and released as DVDScr’s. They usually contain watermarks containing copyright information, which can obscure part of the image. (more…)

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What does “nHD” mean?

Posted on July 16, 2008. Filed under: Definitions | Tags: |

This either means “NhaNc3d HD” or “near HD” – probably the former. It is an abbreviation used by the non-scene release group “NhaNc3”, who operate over P2P, namely through MovieX.info. Their arguent is that their nHD releases are optimized to allow playback on lower-end processors. (more…)

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What does “720p” mean?

Posted on July 16, 2008. Filed under: Definitions | Tags: |

The number 720 is the number of lines of vertical display resolution, while the letter p stands for progressive scan or non-interlaced. (more…)

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What does “x264” mean?

Posted on July 16, 2008. Filed under: Definitions | Tags: |

x264 is a free encoder for various video streams, released under the the GNU General Public License.

It is the most common codec used for high definition releases, thanks to the way files, subtitles etc can be added and removed from it with relative ease.

The codec can be downloaded for free by itself, at http://x264.nl/, or with all the codecs you’ll ever need, bundled into the Combined Community Codec Pack.

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What does “NUKED” mean?

Posted on July 16, 2008. Filed under: Definitions | Tags: |

A release may be NUKED for several reasons. It may be because the group responsible for the release requested it, or there may be something actually wrong with the release. When a release is nuked, a permanent mark is placed on it, and it stops being actively promoted or distribited. Often, a “REPACK” will follow from the same group, fixing the problems, or another group may release a “PROPER”. (more…)

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